Category: Strik

Holiday knitting has started!

We all need a pixie backpack, don’t we, especially when we approach the month of December? I’ve been using the backpack here to test various techniques that I have not been too familiar with. The lower drawstring hem is knitted in double knit, which is then worked together to form – yes, a drawstring. Then I continued in double knit, split the work, and started to knit in the round on a circular needle. Next time I will use a thinner needle for double knitting, there is quite a difference in gauge between the circular knit and double knit. The flap is also worked in double knit. I had a little trouble getting the edges of the flap neat when decreasing, and they should also preferably look the same on both sides. I will have to look more into that.

Test knit, Short sleeved mohair sweater

About the design: This classic knitted blouse has references back to New York during the beginning of the last century, where the neighborhood around Fort Washington on Northern Manhattan was just emerging. Some of the stylish pioneer women still live there and you can meet them, promenading down what used to be Northern Avenue, chick and elegantly dressed. This soft mohair blouse is designed as a tribute the these women. It is worked top down and has set in sleeves. No sewing is required.  The pattern contains instructions for 5 sizes (34 to 42) and would be suitable for an advanced beginner.  I am grateful to Barbara Walker for her inspiring ideas presented in her classic book – Knitting from the top. See more photos here.

About the test: I would like to have the pattern test knit, partly for clarity, readability and errors, partly to boost the number of projects on Ravelry. Test knitters should check  if the yardage estimations are correct for the given size. Test knitters are expected to knit the jacket, and to upload pictures of the finished project to Ravelry. It would be great with photo updates along the way too. There is no compensation to test knitters, except that the pattern is free of course.

Deadline: December 1, 2012 (flexible)

 

Materials and tools: Yarn: 700(750,775,900,1000) yards Rowan Kidsilk Haze (Super Kid Mohair: 70%, Silk: 30%) held double or other mohair blends where gauge can be obtained. 4 mm/US 2½ and 3.5 mm/US 3 circular needles 16 inches and 24 inches long. Double pointed needles, size 4 mm/US 2½ and 3.5 mm/US 3.

Gauge: 18 sts and 24 rows = 4 inches/10 cm in St sts.
Sizes: To fit bust: 34, 36, 38, 40, 42 inches – the blouse is prettiest with no or just a little positive ease.
Difficulty: Advanced beginner

Communication: All communication is done via the test knitting forum on on my website, ingesandholt.dk. I expect test knitters to post regular updates in the thread. I will post all corrections in a dedicated post, so they are assembled one place.

 

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Looking for test knitters

I am in the search of a number of test knitters for my latest patterns, a short sleeved mohair sweater, the Hooded Brioche Scarf ,  a Baby/Toddler Jacket (FULL).  I would like to have the patterns test knit, partly for clarity, readability and errors, partly to boost the number of projects on Ravelry. Test knitters are expected to knit the items, and to upload pictures of the finished project to Ravelry. It would be great with photo updates along the way too. I am not able to offer any compensation to test knitters, I’m afraid, except that the pattern is free of course. Click the images below to sign up!

Mohair sweater. Test starts November 5, 2012. Deadline December 1, 2012

Hooded Brioche Scarf. Test starts November 5, 2012. Deadline November 20, 2012

Baby Jacket. Test starts November 15, 2012. Deadline December 1, 2012

Test knit, Hooded Brioche Scarf

About the design: A very quick hooded scarf worked entirely in brioche stitches. Soft and warm on a cold day, the scarf is likely to be this winters favorite accessory. The shape of the hood follows the head in a very flattering way, and it can be worn as a plain, classic scarf as well. The scarf is worked on large needles in a soft, bulky wool, so it knits up quickly. The scarf is reversible, not identical on both sides, but the wrong side is as pretty as the right side. In the photos, the wrong side is shown. Brioche is a very simple and straightforward stitch pattern and one of my personal favorites. Plain brioche consists of yarn overs and knit stitches only no purl stitches. The pattern contains only standard knitting terms, and no new terminology is introduced so the pattern is a perfect and rewarding beginners brioche project.

About the test: I would like to have the pattern test knit, partly for clarity, readability and errors, partly to boost the number of projects on Ravelry. Test knitters are expected to knit the scarf, and to upload pictures of the finished project to Ravelry. It would be great with photo updates along the way too. There is no compensation to test knitters, except that the pattern course is free.

Start:  Monday, November 5, 2012
Deadline:
 Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Materials: approximately 400 m bulky weight yarn. I’ve used Fritidsgarn from Sandnes. A pair of 7mm needles, darning needle and optional two markers.
Difficulty: Advanced beginner
Communication: All communication is done via the test knitting forum on on my website, ingesandholt.dk. I expect test knitters to post regular updates in the thread, at least every 4th day. I will post all corrections in a dedicated post, so they are assembled one place.

THE TEST IS CLOSED

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Hooded brioche scarf

A quick hooded scarf in brioche. I love to work brioche, there is a good rhythm to it and it eliminates the purl stitches. The scarf is knitted in Fritidsgarn from Sandnes on thick needles (7 mm). The thick needles are in fact far outside my comfort zone, but Fritidsgarn is very loosely spun, so it still is nice to knit with, also using thick sticks. So all in all, a nice project with one of my favorite yarns, my favorite knitting technique, and above all, quick, so DD can keep warm in this cold weather.

My mother knit a lot, but I think she never really enjoied it. She knit socks for the whole family and brioche scarves. Brioche was therefore one of the first knitting techniques I learned, and I do think the technique is well suited for beginners. However, I found it difficult to figure out how increases and decreases are done nicely in brioche, but, ah well, it’s really just until you know how. In my course of Haandarbejdets Fremme with Louise Klindt, we have also had brioche as a theme. So now I have among other things decoded how to make brioche cables, a must for my next scarf project.

Short sleeved Bear Sweater

The Bear Blouse is done! I love the way a very simple sweater construction can give such an elegant result. It is worked top down, which can be advantageous from a design point of view. The fit was perfect, and it is wonderful to be able to try on the sweater along the way, so the length can be customized. I had made all estimations in advance. That’s probably how I work best. In this case, the simple mohair sweater, which is notoriously difficult to unravel, it has certainly been an advantage. On the other hand, I am not sure that the top-down knitting will candidate as my favorite way to knit sweaters in the long run. Nice to have method in the repertoire, and fantastic that the project is finished when the knitting is done, but I don’t feel that the advantage of not having to sew together the sweater  completely outweigh the hassle of having to sit with a large project along the way. But to be honest, I don’t mind mounting anyway.

The sweater has the retro look that I love so much, and I can’t wait to wear the sweater with my new blue silk scarf when I go out for dinner tonight with my DH.

(I’ll just have to get used to my new camera, I’m not completely satisfied with the quality of the photos – but I think my beautiful model compensates for the photographer’s lack of skill.)

The Girl’s Red Baron

 

I have now finished knitting the sport outfit for Kiboko Bondo: a jersey, a pair of running shorts, with plenty or ease, and a helmet. Kiboko looks just like the Red Baron with his helmet, and it’s probably not such a bad thing. I have had the great pleasure of the tips and tricks I’ve learned at the classes by

Louise Klint I took at Haandarbejdets Fremme in the process – the anatomy of ahippo can be quite a challenge when designing. I’ll write more about the design of the outfit later.

The embroidery  hasn’t been finished yet, but now I decoded it, I just need to get it done.

 

 

The Kilimanjaro Marathon 2013

It is with great pride that I now can announce that I have been given the task of designing sportswear for the Danish / Kenyan participants in The Kilimanjaro Marathon 2013! It brings my knitting and designing up in a completely different league, I think Hummel, Stella McCartney … Well, our marathon team here is a bit special because it is made up by a small hippopotamus, Kiboko Bono, who has devoted his life to the Girls – more specifically Plan’s campaign, Because I am a Girl. His assistant, or sponsor if you like, is Lene Rohde, who climbed Killimanjaro on her 50th birthday earlier this year to raise money for girls in Bondo, Kenya.

I embarked on the task of designing and knitting right away, and so far the jersey almost done. The design is very simple, straight up and down, holes for the front legs, a couple of decreases for neck, followed by short rows to give a little shaping. It is closed with buttons in front. And the fit is perfect! The challenge is now to embroider the logo. I have looked in a few books, designed and been thinking, so now I must see to overcome my “fear of the blank embroidery”!

Here’s a little bonus info about Kiboko, copied from his profile on Facebook.

   “Kiboko is Swahili for hippo. I am a friend of everyone but my heart belongs to the girls… and banana cake of course :-) I was made in Indonesia but my true home is Bondo in Kenya, close to the Lake where African hippos feel most at home. I live for adventure and I love to meet people and talk to them about all the girls I love. I travel to remind the world to bring up girls in love and respect. To make sure that all girls have enough to eat, that they sleep safely at night – and that they go to school. As their brothers do…”

Form and estimation


This weekend I took a knitting class at Haandarbejdets Fremme in Copenhagen: “Form and estimation in knitting” by Louise Klindt. Louise is a very inspiring teacher and her input always gives rise to new thinking.

I am often inclined to think knit fabric in flat polygons or triangles instead of 3D. I think Kite at the Charles is a very good example of my way of thinking. At the course we got a quick introduction to fashioning , including a “foot-dress form”, and we would then suggest how it could be covered by a knit fabric. However, it means that one has to think quite differently – an exciting challenge. My solution is still underway, so far, I have captured my food-dress from with my Any Size – any gauge sock. It looks a little spooky in the picture, I  have to admit, but anyway,  just look how nicely the sock fits. Now, I would really like to have a real dress form, because I can see the opportunities it provides for a completely different design process than I’m used to. I will have to sign up for a course in dress form making!

And by the way, there are several knitting courses Haandarbejdets Fremme – check the website.